Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Amazing Words: Do you know who first coined the word Yahoo?

Each week, I’m going to present an amazing word. This week I will present FOUR. 

Introducing the amazing Jonathan Swift at the ripe old age of 347.

Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels is one of the better known works of the 18th Century and one of the earliest examples of science fiction. 

In particular, the floating island of Laputa, which is dripping in symbolism depicting the English rule over the Irish at the time—Jonathan Swift was a High Church Anglican and Dean of St Patrick's Cathedral in Dublin. Laputa, which is Spanish for the whore, represented England.

Gulliver’s Travels is an amazing book for a number of reasons, but I will focus here on a couple of the amazing words Swift made up in his book that are now used in the English language. Then I will introduce a couple of very "modern" words first coined by Mr. Swift. 

Monday, January 26, 2015

Passion does not excuse not Proof Reading

Okay, I had a bit of a bad post on Saturday's Blood ties is no longer science fiction.

I rushed to publish my post, not because I was pressed for time but because I was so excited to share. 

This mistake reminded me, after the fact, of one of the best pieces of advice ever given to me: 

"Your greatest strength is also your greatest weakness, so watch out.” 

Sunday, January 25, 2015

Blood Ties is no longer Science Fiction

In King Lear, Shakespeare wrote: 

“Jesters do oft prove prophets”.

I argue that so do novelists. 

In my novel Blood Ties my protagonists battle with moral dilemma of the youth giving properties of blood. 

This same discussion takes place in the latest issue of Nature magazine, where they run an article called, Aging Research: Blood to Blood

The headline reads: 

“By splicing animals together, scientists have shown that young blood rejuvenates old tissues. Now, they are testing whether it works for humans.


Friday, January 23, 2015

Monty Python: Novel Writing is the Last Great Spectator Sport.



Now, who said novel writing wasn't a spectator sport. I feel it is definitely up there with most sports played on ice...hockey, curling, dancing. Though it might challenge cricket for longevity. 

Monty Python always knew how to challenge the more fringe articles in life.




Novel Writing Day Opening Day

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

A Quick 5 Point Novel Guide to WHETHER vs. IF


Firstly, here we are not discussing the weather, though I will use weather related examples. 

This is examining the other WHETHER.

WHETHER vs. IF is important to remember because the meaning of a sentence can sometimes be different depending on your use of WHETHER or IF. 

The formal rule is to use IF when you have a conditional sentence and WHETHER when you are showing that two alternatives are possible.

Here is a Quick 5 Point Novel Guide to WHETHER vs. IF

Monday, January 19, 2015

Amazing Words: Tintinnabulation

Each week, I’m going to present an amazing word. A word that has a double meaning either directly or perhaps through origin, where is has evolved into a new meaning, or carries a wonderful Onomatopoeic effect.

This week my amazing word is:

TINTINNABULATION    


Saturday, January 17, 2015

Gilly - From SNL is Weird and Brilliant

Gilly is played by Kristen Wig.

My girls and their friends love this..."sarry!"

Click Here for the brilliant Gilly

Thursday, January 15, 2015

A Quick 5 Point Novel Guide to the Semicolon

I want to start by answering a quick question I received. 
What is the difference between a colon and a semicolon? 

A lot! 

Do not let the fact the share the same surname make you think they are closely related, they are barely second-cousins, if they were royalty they could marry. 

The better question is: what is the difference between a semicolon and a period? They are almost brother and sister, if they were royalty they would need to limit their relationship to nocturnal incest.

But there is so much to a semicolon, I felt it deserved its own Quick 5 Point Novel Guide.

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Amazing Words: Discursive

Each week, I’m going to present an amazing word. 

A word that has a double meaning either directly or perhaps through origin, where is has evolved into a new meaning, or carries a wonderful Onomatopoeic effect.


This week my amazing word is:

DISCURSIVE


Tuesday, January 13, 2015

Who Wrote the Quote?

  

Who wrote the quote? 

"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools."              


Sunday, January 11, 2015

A Quick 5 Point Novel Guide to LAY vs. LIE.


Okay, I am the first to put my hands up. In my novel, Blood Ties, I made a mistake regarding the use of LAY. 

When my friend pointed the error out, I had no clue I had used LAY incorrectly, then and all previous times before—I’m forty...something—and that is a lot of errors.

But don’t you worry because I will make sure you do not spend the next forty plus years using it incorrectly.

A quick 5 point novel guide to LAY vs. LIE.

Friday, January 9, 2015

Charles Hebdo: What of Qisas?

For me, this cartoon speaks most deeply.

By the French artist Delize. 

The text reads:


"Believers hurt by non-believers" (the man crying on the left) and "Non-believers hurt by believers." (the man lying in the pool of blood on the right).

Thursday, January 8, 2015

Amazing Words: Canoodle

Each week, I’m going to present an amazing word. A word that has a double meaning either directly or perhaps through origin, where is has evolved into a new meaning, or carries a wonderful Onomatopoeic effect.

This week my amazing word is:

CANOODLE


Wednesday, January 7, 2015

A Quick 5 Point Novel Guide to WHOM vs. WHO

A great deal has been written about the use of WHO vs. WHOM, most of which revolves around the incorrect use of WHOM. 

If you correctly say WHOM people can think it snobbish or even superior, regardless of it being correct; however, if you use WHOM incorrectly you can sound superior and stupid.


As it is common for people not to know the correct usage of the word WHOM, it is usually forgivable to use WHO incorrectly…usually! If you work in advertising or anywhere where your incorrect use of grammar can affect you negatively, it is important to get this right.


It is easy to work out whether to use WHO or WHOM once you know the subject and object of a sentence.

Here is my Quick 5 Point Novel Guide to WHOM vs. WHO.


Sunday, January 4, 2015

Why else would you go to a shooting range?

Not only can you win money, but you can save money too!

Friday, January 2, 2015

Amazing Words: Sanguine


Each week, I’m going to present an amazing word. A word that has a double meaning either directly or perhaps through origin, where is has evolved into a new meaning, or carries a wonderful Onomatopoeic effect.


This week my amazing word is:

SANGUINE