Saturday, December 20, 2014

A Quick 5 Point Novel Guide to using THAT vs. WHICH


One of the most confusing aspects of writing is the use of that instead of which? I am going to give you are easy way to remember.

Here is A Quick 5 point novel guide.


Consider the following four sentences. Two are correct, do you know which and why?  



   
  1. New photos of U.F.O.’s, which are becoming rare, are usually blurred.
  2. New photos of U.F.O.’s, that are becoming rare, are usually blurred.
  3. I love new cars that are red.
  4. I love new cars, which are red.


1. Restrictive Clause

A restrictive clause is a part of a sentence you cannot get rid of, e.g., Cars that go fast are sexy. The restrictive part is that go fast, they restrict the cars we are talking about to only fast cars; otherwise, if we remove it, the sentence meaning will change to say all cars are sexy.


2. Always use that with a restrictive clause

The thing to remember is if the part of the sentence is absolutely needed to for the meaning of the sentence then use that. Go back to our example at the start and decide which of a, b, c, or d are right.


3. Non-restrictive Clause

A nonrestrictive clause is a part of a sentence you can remove without changing the meaning of the sentence. Fast cars, which are expensive, are sexy. The part of the sentence which is expensive can be removed without changing the meaning of the sentence.


4. Always use which with a nonrestrictive clause

The thing to remember is if the part of the sentence can be removed without changing the meaning of the sentence then we use which. Go back to our example at the start and decide which of a, b, c, or d are right.


5. Remember

A little way I use to remember.

“You need that clause!”


The correct answers are a and c.
If removed, are becoming rare, does not change the meaning of the sentence.
If removed, are red, does change the meaning of the sentence.